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History of Jim Ned

Jim Ned, who has his name in several different places on the Texas map, was an ornery, intelligent Delaware Indian chief. Sometimes called James Ned, he was mentioned frequently, but not always admiringly, in 1840's Republic of Texas communications concerning Indian affairs. He appears to have had a village on the Brazos near present day Whitney and Hillsboro. He often served as interpreter and scout for white parties going into Indian country.

 

 In 1844 Jim Ned was an interpreter at a council Sam Houston arranged with a number of Indian chiefs at Tehuacana Creek, near present day Mexia. The Indian leaders there included Lame Arm of the Wacos, Black Cat of the Shawnees, Chicken Trotter of the Cherokees, and Bedi or Bead Eye of the Lonis.

 

Soon after this council the Superintendent of Indian Affairs for the Republic of Texas was complaining that "Jim Ned and his party have become a little better than a band of outlaws". Thomas Western, the Indian Bureau boss, wrote to Houston: "The Delaware, Jim Ned, is a refractory spirit, as I have already noticed to your Excellency." Some of his escapades took him to Mexico and seldom did he return empty-handed. Although noted for his generous hospitality, he had a sensitive disposition and allowed no one to interfere with his favorite pastime. Several Delawares were said to have paid for incurring his wrath with their lives. Despite such a shady reputation, Jim Ned did prove a capable scout and spy, having spent some time among the Penateka Comanche and learning their customs and habits.

 

As for what Jim Ned is in the present day, it's a community of small towns located in Taylor County, south of Abilene, Texas. Throughout the 1900's a total of 31 small schools decided to consolidate and form Jim Ned CISD. Tuscola High School became South Taylor High School around 1948. It later became Jim Ned High School when Lawn consolidated in 1957.

 

Jim Ned is also the name of a creek that runs through the district, and this area is called the Jim Ned Valley. You can find more information about Jim Ned from the links below.
 
 

 

Jim Ned History Links 
Handbook of Texas Online

 

Taylor County Historical Markers